The Gluten-Free Diet Goes Grain-Free and Gourmet

by Becky Rider

Welcome to your gluten-free, grain-free lifestyle.  Adjusting to your new gluten-free diet can seem like a lot of work, but you will be rewarded with vibrant health and relief of your symptoms. Enjoying organic, minimally processed, whole foods instead of packaged, chemical-laden, processed foods will give your body the tools it needs to heal, and you'll be filled with energy and vitality.

Adopting a gluten-free diet allows you to make healthful changes to your lifestyle, most especially by choosing fresh, unprocessed or minimally processed foods that will promote healing and allow your body to return to normal.  The gourmet gluten- and grain-free lifestyle offers you delicious foods, fine wines, beers, and spirits, aromatic products for home and body, and radiant wellness to enjoy it all.

Choose your entrée from the menu below, or from the bar to the left.  Learn how to know for sure if you are sensitive to gluten or grains, and develop the habit of eating with intention, whether or not you are sensitive to gluten.

Find gluten-free and grain-free recipes for foods you will be delighted to serve your family and friends, and see how easy it can be to prepare grain-free sauces, main courses, vegetables, and desserts bursting with flavor that feature fresh, nutritious ingredients.

The gluten-free, grain-free lifestyle is still mostly about living.  Join us here, and live well.  

Eating Well On a Gluten-Free Diet

Living gluten-free does not mean having to eat poor-quality substitutes for all the foods you love, nor does it mean missing out on pot-lucks, restaurants, and picnics.

Changing how you think about food and cooking
, and doing a bit of planning and preparation, will help you adjust to your new, healthier lifestyle much more easily.

You can prepare gourmet meals that you would be proud to serve anyone by learning just a few techniques and following the recipes.  Many meals require no grains at all to prepare, and the results are amazing.

Eating well on a gluten-free diet really is no different from eating well:  buy freshest, highest-quality foods you can, choosing locally sourced, organic, pastured, or wild-caught when possible, and prepare them simply.  Add a luscious sauce or a decadent dessert, and you have a meal fit for royalty.

Preparing gourmet meals takes no more time, effort, or expense than preparing poorly thought-out meals, and the difference between the two is astounding.  Take a few minutes now to look around and get some ideas, and bookmark this site, so you can come back often, as I am constantly adding new recipes, meal suggestions, and techniques.  

Is A Gluten-Free Diet Really Necessary?

*I am not a medical professional, so I can't give you medical advice.  I can, however, share what I've learned from managing my own condition, from my extensive reading, and from talking with others. Consult your health care practitioner for advice specifically for you.*

Some people, such as those with celiac disease, truly need to follow a gluten-free diet. Has it become faddish?  Absolutely.  Are lots of celebrities eating this way even though they don't need to?  Of course: that's one way they stay in the spotlight. These cases certainly don't invalidate the necessity of avoiding gluten for those who actually are sensitive - and that group includes more people all the time.

Of course, those with celiac disease must avoid the glutens in wheat, barley, spelt, oats, and rye. Recent research, however, has revealed more correlations with other grains, and the recommendations coming out of these studies indicate that all grains have glutens, and are therefore damaging to those with celiac disease.

And remember:  corn is a grain, not a vegetable.  Many people are finding that removing corn products (like corn syrup/high-fructose corn syrup, corn starch, corn meal, maltodextrin from corn, popcorn, and other corn-based ingredients) from their diets has brought significant symptom relief.

Another correlation becoming apparent in these studies is that those with auto-immune diseases other than celiac disease should also be avoiding grains. Rheumatoid arthritis and lupus have been particularly well-studied, and the correlation between grain consumption and inflammation leading to increases in symptoms is more and more often being interpreted as causation.

Additionally, many persons without a diagnosed auto-immune disease have felt better upon avoiding grains.  Does this imply causation?  No.  But what if they choose to avoid grains because they feel better?  Seems like a pretty good reason to me.

The recent finding that has stirred up the medical community the most indicates that it may not be the glutens that are the culprit; lectins and certain other proteins may be the cause instead.  While this shift in probable causation makes a tremendous difference in the research, in practice, grains are the source of all the proteins in question, so a  fully gluten-free diet - meaning no grains at all - would solve the lectin problem as well.  

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I am pleased to recommend the Celiac Restaurant Guide to all Living Gluten Free guests.  This useful guide will allow you to select celiac-safe restaurants, so you can dine out with confidence.


Your health matters.
You may require different approaches from those suggested here.
Always consult a qualified medical practitioner before modifying
your diet, supplements, medications, or exercise program.
The information on this website is not intended to replace the professional advice of a qualified medical practitioner. Always seek competent medical advice about healthcare, medication, exercise, diet, and/or supplements.

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